Flood Survivors Rebuild Lives With no Government Support

Large parts Madhya Pradesh got washed away in the monsoon floods of 2013. From 6 districts alone, over 38,000 people were affected. Five months later, the residents Gheriandana village, in Betul district are struggling to put their lives back together. There’s no trace of the compensation they were promised.

“My house was damaged to begin with and I had been waiting for them (government) to approve my house loan. The flood destroyed it. My bicycle was smashed; my cow had a narrow escape” says Jaggu the owner of one of 50 houses damaged in the village.

Another resident, Suraj reveals that since his rations were washed away, the government public distribution scheme has been of no help. Both Suraj and Jaggu have their Below Poverty Line cards which entitle them to food grains and money to build houses under regular circumstances.

As the floods wreaked havoc, the Government of Madhya Pradesh went all out to start rescue operations.It also announced increased compensations of Rs.70,000 for any type of house– slums, mud huts or cemented.

What is the purpose of announcing large schemes and compensations when those who need it the most don’t get access to them? VV-PACS CC Mohan lal reports from Betul, Madhya Pradesh.

Call to Action: Public Works Department of Ghoradongri block on +919009070210 and ask them to ensure that the residents get housing and the other provisions ensured to them.

 

About the Partnership: The Poorest Areas Civil Society (PACS) Programme and Video Volunteers have come together to create the Community Correspondents Network. The videos generated by the network will be able to highlight voices from the margins, providing skills to social communicators to provide advocacy tools to community based organisations.

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