Ayurveda Helps Villagers Stay Healthy

People in remote Indian village use Ayurveda to deal with inadequate health care.

Health care is bad in Kochila Nuagao village, where Sarita lives. They have come up with their own solution – ayurveda, and it’s having a positive impact on their overall health. In 2004, an NGO called Sambandh started teaching people in Kochila Nuagao, how to grow ayurvedic plants and use them to treat various illnesses. They also gave the families saplings of certain plants to grow in their own gardens. Kochila Nuagao is located 20 kilometres from the nearest proper hospital in Choudar, and five kilometres from the nearest clinic in Mangarajpur. The only mode of transport to reach these places is a bus which comes by every five hours. With such a bleak health care situation, the usage of natural herbal healing techniques was a laudable solution, that has already resulted in better health amongst the villagers.

Out of a population of approximately 2000 people, Sarita says that five or six people would die from malaria every month. This number has reduced in the last few years, ever since they started actively practicing ayurveda – they take a mixture of ‘gangasiuli’, ‘bhunim’ and ‘mehndi’ on a daily basis. Sarita suffers from asthma, and has been treating herself with flowers from the ‘basnga’ plant. When the plant doesn’t flower, she takes the leaves and mixes them with honey. She says it brings her quick relief.

Her fellow villagers have become adept at self-diagnosis and preventive treatment, and have managed to cure themselves of jaundice on several occasions. It has become a habit in many of the families to regularly take certain concoctions of marigolds and basil which are known for their medicinal properties, especially in treatment of house colds and bronchitis.

Sarita suggests that in villages like hers, with lack of adequate medical health facilities, people should follow Kochila Nuagao’s example. If they can get hold of someone who knows about ayurveda, they can begin growing and using these plants themselves. As she has shown in her video, it is an effective and easy way of natural treatment.

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