Polluting touch: Rotis thrown from a distance

An "upper caste" household pays a sweeper women for her services by standing at a distance and flinging food like charity into the folds of her sari.

Community Correspondent, Sunita Kasera shows how the woman belonging to Bhangi(Dalit) community is not allowed into the compounds of houses and are given rotis, thrown from a distance. Even children are seen to be resorting to this practice of Untouchability. This so-called “tradition” exists despite the fact that the enforcement of any disability arising out of Untouchability is an offence punishable in accordance with law as per the Article 17 of the Indian Constitution.  It was drafted in 1949 specifically to eradicate & abolish the practice of Untouchability. Yet  68 years later, the practice still reigns in far too many parts of the country.This is a shocking proof to the fact that caste barriers in India are still alive and strong.

This video is a part of the “Article 17” campaign launched by Video Volunteers, in order to urge theNational Commission for Schedule Castes, which is the government body that is constitutionally appointed to direct and implement the safeguards against untouchability, to prosecute cases of untouchability.

 

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